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Anthony Fenn Kemp[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

Male 1773 - 1868  (95 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Anthony Fenn Kemp 
    Born 1773  Aldgate, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 7, 8, 9
    Christened 16 Jan 1774  St Botolph Without Aldgate, London, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 10
    Gender Male 
    AFN 1FZV-2N0 
    Died 28 Oct 1868  Sandy Bay, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Notes 
    • Anthony Fenn Kemp (1773?-1868), soldier and merchant, was born near Aldgate, London, the son of Anthony Fader Kemp, merchant, and Susannah, née Fenn. After being educated in Greenwich by Dr Knox, he traveled in the United States for about a year and then in France. In July 1793 he was commissioned ensign in the New South Wales Corps and arrived in Sydney with a detachment of the regiment about two years later. During 1795-97 he served a tour of duty on Norfolk Island. He was promoted lieutenant in March 1797 and captain in November 1801. Towards the end of 1800 he left for London on leave. On his return to Sydney in 1802 he married Elizabeth, the sister of Alexander Riley, by whom he had seven sons and eleven daughters, and so qualified in one sense for the soubriquet he longed for, 'the father of Tasmania'.

      Like many of his brother officers, Kemp was as much occupied with trade as with his military duties. In November 1799 he was granted a lease of what is now the north-west corner of King and George Streets, where he built a shop. As paymaster of his company and later treasurer of the Committee of Paymastership of the corps, Kemp was strategically placed to dispose of his wares at high prices. Against his bullying and threats the soldiers had no redress, though it must be remembered that 'truck' was then common and, since there was no currency in the colony, payment in kind was inevitable; however, Joseph Holt, perhaps with some exaggeration, reckoned Kemp's profits at 100 per cent.

      In September 1802 Kemp was received into the grade of Ancient Masonry at the first lodge known to have assembled in Australia. Two of the three members were officers of Le Naturaliste, one of the three ships of Captain Nicolas Baudin's expedition. This was not, however, the most important of Kemp's involvements with the French. When the Atlas arrived with a cargo of brandy Governor Philip Gidley King refused to let the cargo land, but allowed Baudin to buy 800 gallons (3637 litres) to stock his ships. Kemp led an outcry against the governor's action and, on doubtful evidence, accused the French of bringing brandy ashore and selling it at 25s. a gallon. King questioned two of the French officers and was convinced of their innocence. Some of them spoke of challenging Kemp, but Baudin restrained them; under pressure from his fellow officers, Kemp tendered Baudin a written apology but the incident reveals his extremism.

      Soon afterwards Kemp was involved in the notorious pamphlet war which so plagued King. In January 1803 a paper containing a scurrilous attack on King was found in the yard of Kemp's barracks. King ordered the arrest of Kemp and two junior officers, Nicholas Bayly and Thomas Hobby. The subsequent court martial of Kemp had barely begun when Major George Johnston, who was temporarily in command of the corps, ordered the arrest of Surgeon John Harris, the officer acting as judge-advocate, on the ground that Harris had disclosed the votes of members of the court at the earlier trial of Hobby. At first King refused to replace Harris and ordered the court martial to dissolve, but Johnston replied that the officers would continue to sit until they had delivered a verdict. The governor then yielded and appointed Richard Atkins to act as judge-advocate in the case. Kemp was acquitted.

      In 1804 King appointed Kemp second-in-command to Colonel William Paterson of the proposed new settlement at Port Dalrymple. From August 1806 to April 1807, while Paterson was absent in Sydney, Kemp administered the settlement in his stead. During this period provisions ran low and for a time, early in 1807, hunting and fishing were the only sources of food. Disaffection grew and an insurrection was averted only by arresting the leaders of the dissidents.

      In August 1807 Kemp returned to Sydney. He was the senior officer in the Criminal Court which assembled on 25 January 1808 to try John Macarthur for sedition. He and the five other officers of the court supported Macarthur when he declared that Judge-Advocate Atkins was unfit to appear in the case. Next morning, when the officers asked Governor William Bligh to restore Macarthur to bail and requested Atkins's replacement, Kemp appeared to be one of the most extreme of the governor's opponents. When Johnston decided to depose Bligh, Kemp and three other officers were sent ahead to summon him to resign his authority and to assure him of his personal safety.

      On 28 May Johnston, acting as governor, appointed Kemp, who had certainly been one of the leaders in the attack on Bligh, as acting deputy judge advocate. In that capacity he was a member of the illegal Criminal Court which tried the provost-marshal, William Gore, for perjury, although four of its members, including Kemp, were among the defendant's accusers. In December Kemp was posted commandant at Parramatta, and thereupon relinquished his position as acting judge-advocate. In 1810 he returned to England when the corps was sent home. He was one of Johnston's witnesses at his court martial in 1811; more fortunate than his superior in not being tried himself, he was able to sell his commission, but his magistrate's warrant and most of his land grants were canceled. He became a partner in a commercial and shipping agency, though apparently this did not prosper, for he moved into and out of bankruptcy before receiving permission in 1815 to settle in Van Diemen's Land.

      Kemp arrived there in January 1816. A year later Lieutenant-Governor Thomas Davey granted him 700 acres (283 ha) at Green Ponds, the first grant to be made in the district. By 1829 Kemp had two adjoining grants, making a total of 2000 acres (809 ha). Soon afterwards, in consideration of his improvements, a further 1000 acres (405 ha) were leased to him, and he bought another 1100 acres (445 ha). In the 1830s he bought more, as well as renting large areas in the Lakes district. At Green Ponds Kemp bred first-class sheep and helped to pioneer the Tasmanian wool industry. He also bred horses and raised cattle and, about 1831, introduced a hardy, drought-resistant variety of dwarf American corn (Cobbett's) which was suitable for swine, poultry and horses.

      However, Kemp was better known as a merchant than as a grazier. He was a foundation director and later president of the Van Diemen's Land Bank. Soon after his arrival in Hobart Town he had established the firm of Kemp & Gatehouse, which was changed to Kemp & Co. about 1823 when Richard Barker was taken into partnership. After this was dissolved in 1829, Kemp continued the shipping, mercantile and importing business from a central Macquarie Street store. In 1839 he sold this property and limited his activities to his premises in Collins and Argyle Streets. In 1844, during the general depression, he sold his last city block, and a fellow merchant, Richard Lewis, bought his residence and store.

      In April 1816 Governor Lachlan Macquarie appointed Kemp a justice of the peace, but in 1817-19 he was involved in a series of quarrels, first with Lieutenant-Governor Davey and then with his successor, William Sorell. In June 1818 Macquarie confirmed Kemp's suspension from the magistracy. In 1820 Kemp, critical as always, testified at length to Commissioner John Thomas Bigge about Sorell's immorality, discriminatory administration and the excessive consumption of spirits, but by the time Sorell was recalled one of Kemp's daughters had married one of Sorell's sons and Kemp had swung round to a profound appreciation of the lieutenant-governor's virtues. In January 1824 Kemp was chairman of a 'Committee appointed at a Public Meeting of the Landholders, Merchants and Free Inhabitants of Van Diemen's Land' to draft a petition to the King that Sorell's tenure of office be extended; but this was unavailing.

      From 1824 to 1836 Kemp found the authority of Lieutenant-Governor (Sir) George Arthur as irksome as that of his predecessors. Kemp expressed republican sympathies, and opposed many official measures; through the press, public meetings, petitions and correspondence, he advocated the independence of Van Diemen's Land from New South Wales (granted in 1826), the establishment of an elected Legislative Council, the abolition of press censorship, and the adoption of the English jury system. In 1837 Arthur's successor, Sir John Franklin, who was more sympathetic to the development of free institutions, appointed Kemp to the board to inquire into applications for secondary grants, and in October Franklin reappointed him a justice of the peace.

      Kemp died at Sandy Bay on 28 October 1868, in his ninety-fifth year and was buried in St George's Church of England cemetery. His wife had predeceased him in October 1865, aged 79. Of his family, George Anthony became the first warden of the Green Ponds municipality and Edward followed the example of the 'pipes' of King's time by writing a bitter attack on Lieutenant-Governor Sir John Eardley-Wilmot in satirical verse in A Voice from Tasmania (1846). Of Kemp's nine daughters known to have married, Elizabeth Julia became the wife of William Sorell, registrar of the Supreme Court of Tasmania; Sophia, the wife of William Seccombe, medical practitioner; and Fanny Edith, the wife of Captain Algernon Burdett Jones, visiting magistrate and superintendent of the Queen's Orphan Schools.

      Kemp may be remembered mainly for his notorious early exploits in New South Wales, but he also played a notable pioneering role in Van Diemen's Land, both as merchant and grazier, where his 'inherent aversion of despotism' was harnessed to some worthwhile causes.

      Select Bibliography ¦M. C. and T. B. Kemp, ‘Captain Anthony Fenn Kemp’, Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society, 51 (1965), and for bibliography.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Fenn_Kemp

      Travel books <http://books.guardian.co.uk/departments/travel/front/0,6000,,00.html> Paradise regained? Penny Green finds Nicholas Shakespeare's investigation into settlers In Tasmania produces an interesting result Saturday January 1, 2005The Guardian <http://www.guardian.co.uk>

      Buy In Tasmania at the Guardian bookshop <http://www.guardianbookshop.co.uk/BerteShopWeb/viewProduct.do?ISBN=1843431572>

      In Tasmania by Nicholas Shakespeare 320pp, Harvill, £20

      In Tasmania is an outsider's tale - an outsider who wishes to be an insider - and on this count Nicholas Shakespeare was lucky. Having first fallen in love with Tasmania's east coast, his subsequent discovery of letters held by his grandmother revealed distant ancestors whose stories illuminated the history of Tasmania's early white settlement. Shakespeare focuses on Anthony Fenn Kemp, a distant relative whom most Tasmanians would be surprised to hear described as "the father of Tasmania". The more we learn of this cruel, pompous and unpleasant bootlegger, who fled England in disgrace and came to hold positions of some authority in the new colony of Van Diemen's Land, the more likely it seems that thetitle was one of self-invention.

      In Tasmania is a mixture of history, genealogy, travelogue and journalism. The history is perhaps the least successful section of the book. The narrative becomesmired in the minutiae of Kemp's political and business manoeuvres. Here Shakespeare presents a multitudinous array of bit-characters and their relationships with Kemp, but quickly confuses the reader. He is best when he writes about the Tasmanians he encounters on his travels around the state. He captures their guileless charm and contented insularity with genuine warmth. Describing how he fell into conversation with an old fisherman at the mouth of the Swan River who asked his name, he writes: "'Shakespeare?' - he looked at me excited as if he had doubted what he had heard - 'Not Shakespeare? You couldn't possibly be related to the family who make the fishing tackle?'"

      Through some detailed inquiries he discovers more distant relatives on the state's north-west coast - Maud and Ivy, "two tiny old women... in unbuttoned hand-knitted, turquoise cardigans and fluffy slippers" so frail that Shakespeare felt they would "crackle like two poppadoms" if he hugged them. They had lived all their lives in the one small farmhouse and the furthest they had ever travelled was to Launceston, 70 miles to the east, and that was more than 55 years ago in 1947. Maud and Ivy embody the beliefof many of Shakespeare's Tasmanian informants: when living in paradise, why travel elsewhere?

      Van Diemen's Land was infamous as a cruel and unrelenting penal colony. Today, however, Tasmanians search the archives and public records in the hope of finding a convict ancestor in order to embed themselves in the early history of their nation. There is cachet in convict heritage: no longer the "stain", it now represents a powerful and authentic claim to Tasmanian identity.

      Identity is a major theme of In Tasmania and Shakespeare's exploration of contemporary Aboriginality is perhaps themost engaging section of the book. At first settlement there were an estimated 4,000 Tasmanian Aborigines. Then there was genocide, exemplified ideologically by the "Black Line" in which 2,200 settlers, soldiers and convicts set out to herd, kill or capture as many Aborigines as possible. That only one man and a child were captured belies the significance of the attempt. The traditional Aboriginal population was soon after to disappear through settler brutality, denigration and disease.

      Tasmanian history, until the work of revisionist historians such as Henry Reynolds, held that Truganini was the last Tasmanian Aborigine, and that when she died in 1876, so too had a whole race. On the small islands off the coast of Tasmania - Bruny, Cape Barron and Flinders - islanders of mixed race(aboriginal and European) had flourished, but as "Islanders" not "Aboriginals". Today some 16,000 Tasmanians identify themselves as Aboriginal but claims to Aboriginal identity are frequently remote,confused, spurious and sometimes bitterly contested. In 2002 a woman's claim to Aboriginality was rejected while her full brother's claim was accepted.

      The lack of a written language and the loss of the Tasmanian tribal languages has meant that little is now known about the traditional culture. Today on the Bass Strait islands "the one cultural activity... central to defining modern Aboriginal identity", mutton-birding, is already in serious decline. Shakespeare reports Henry Reynolds: "If you are saying you are a Tasmanian Aboriginal you are saying that you are something that you don'tknow how to be. You don't know how to live it." Here is the nub of the problem. One of Shakespeare's most powerful insights is on the whole question of Aboriginal identity which, as he documents, hasbeen unable to incorporate the concept of a "mixed identity". "I wondered how much of the confusion had arisen from a decision by the political leadership to reject the richness of their background and to embrace Aboriginality as the sum of their identity."

      There are inaccuracies and a good deal of conjecture in the book but these are likely to irritate only Tasmanian readers - it is absurd, for example, to suggest that an incident in which an escaped convict resorted to cannibalism has become "embedded in the Tasmanian psyche", or that there are "common Tasmanian habits... of concealing one's racial origins". But perhaps these irritations are simply the sensitivities of a Tasmanian unhappy with imprecise, lazy generalisations. I did, however, discover the scientific explanation forthe fantastic clarity of light which forces the donning of sunglasses the minute one steps off the plane on to the tarmac at Launceston's Western Junction airport.

      Tasmania is an enigmatic place and Shakespeare captures it with an appreciative eye - coastal, remote and deeply beautiful, with still largely unexplored ancient rainforests, perfect bays, mountains, lakes and pure white, glistening beaches. But in many ways Tasmania is as much about extinction and loss as it is about unique wilderness and physical beauty. Its remoteness gives cover to a dark history and a careless and corrupt present that is only alluded to in the book. The near genocide of the Tasmanian Aborigines, the forced extinction of the thylacine or Tasmanian tiger, followed by the criminal destruction of uniqueold-growth forests by logging companies, a dramatic decline in the islander occupation of mutton-birding and the perpetual haemorrhage of Tasmania's young people to pastures more alluring - all mark apersistent inability by those governing Tasmania to value its environment.

      The logging issue is the most important. For more than 30 years Tasmania has been squandering its greatest asset - theexotic old-growth forests of eucalyptus, myrtle, sassafrass, leatherwood and celery-top pine. The destruction of these rainforests through clear-felling and napalm in the interests of corporate profit is an obscenity. The wealth has not trickled down into the state's economy and Tasmania remains the poorest of Australia's eight states and territories, its rate of unemployment the highest.

      And in a sense Shakespeare grasps the contradiction of Tasmania as a place where progress is paralysed not only by craven government but by myth and history: "We walk back along our footprints that thesea has not washed away and not for the first time do I have the feeling that I am following the tracks of a strange backward-walking creature."

      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Mt Vernon, New South Wales, Australia is located in the south east corner of the City of Penrith. Kemps Creek forms its northern and western boundary with Mamre Road providing a boundary on its west along with Kemps Creek. The City of Fairfield is to its east. Mt. Vernon is a sparsely populated rural neighbourhood adjoining Kemps Creek on the edge of the City of Penrith. It is an undulating hilly suburb with spectacular views to the Blue Mountains ensuring high scenic qualities of the area. It is a secuded rural area within the City of Penrith providing a close community atmosphere for its residents. A high visual sensitivity classification was incorporated in local government planning of this area with development not approved which would degrade its viewscape.

       

      Origin of the place name - Mt Vernon

       

      Mt Vernon takes its name from one of the two parcels of land on South Creek granted to Anthony Fenn Kemp (1773-1868). The largest, granted in 1820 was of 500 acres (Parish of Melville) and was named Mt Vernon, presumably after George Washington's home in Virginia in America. While the other, grantedin 1810, was of 300 acres and is in both the Parish of Melville and Cabramatta, straddling Elizabeth Drive and Mamre Road).

       

      Anthony Fenn Kemp

      (1773-1868)

       

      Soldier and merchant. He was born in London, the son of Anthony Fader Kemp and Susannah Fenn. He travelled to the United States and France before arriving in Australia as an ensign in 1795 as part of theNSW Corps. From 1795 to 1797 he served on Norfolk Island being promoted to lieutenant. In 1801 he was promoted to captain. In 1802 he married Elizabeth Riley, daughter of Alexander Riley. Kemp leasedland on the corner of George and King streets where he built a shop outside the Barracks gate and charged high prices for his goods. Kemp was one of the more militant officers and was involved in attacks on Governor King's administration and was in the vanguard of those who arrested Governor William Bligh on 26 January 1808. After a series of economic upheavals Kemp successfully applied to settlein Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) and where once again he made his mark as a grazier and merchant. He died at Sandy Bay a wealthy man in 1868 at the age of 95 and was buried at St George's Church of

      England cemetery.

       

       

      Source: Kemp, M. C. 'Anthony Fenn Kemp', in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume two, London, MUP, 1967.

      Kemp, M. C. & Kemp, T. B. 'Captain Anthony Fenn Kemp', Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society, Vol. 51, 1965.

       

      Historical

       

      *

      Murray C Kemp & Therese B Kemp, 'CaptainAnthony Fenn Kemp', Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society, Vol 51, pt 1 (March 1965).

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The next reference to freemasonry which concerned the N.S.W Corps was a ceremony that Capt Anthony Fenn Kemp of the N.S.W. Corps underwent in a French "Lodge" "not regularly constituted but properlyassembled" on board one of Baudin's ships during their stay in Sydney in 1802. Anthony Fenn Kemp was born at Aldgate, London in 1773, and educated at Greenwich. He arrived in Port Jackson as an ensign with Governor Hunter in June 1790. Fenn was one of Macarthur's cabal and deeply involved in the arrest of Governor Bligh. He returned to England and was a witness for the defence in Lt. Col. Johnston's court martial on the charge of mutiny. Kemp's evidence was proven to be false and mostly hearsay. He remained in England for four years then returned to Van Diemen's Land in 1815. Fenn died at "Bertrams" in the Sandy Bay district of Hobart on the 28th October,1868.

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      Decisions of the Nineteenth Century Tasmanian Superior Courts

       

      Wise v. Kemp

       

      Supreme Court of Van Diemen's Land

       

      17 October 1835

       

      Source: Tasmanian, 23 October 1835[1]

       

      This was an action brought for slander by the plaintiff, John Wise, against Anthony Fenn Kemp, esq., for making use of certain offensive expressions in reference to plaintiff’s business as a publican. Mr. Attorney General opened the proceedings, by an eloquent address to the gentlemen of the Jury, after which, the Solicitor General proceeded to call the witnesses.

       

      Mr. W. Wise is brother to plaintiff who was a publican; plaintiff has been a publican upwards of two years; knows defendant; about 4th or 6th of April; saw Mr. Kemp near the Commercial Bank; he said, I have received another circular from your brother. Mr. John Wise, calling his creditors together; he said he was a swindler, and nothing else but a swindler; witness said he himself was a creditor, and was satisfied there was 20s. in the pound for them all; he again repeated the words; he then said he (Mr. Wise) had six casks of Porter from him, (Mr. Kemp) and now wants to swindle me out of it; there wasa great many people in the street.

       

      By Mr. Gellibrand. - John Wise owed him near £100, at the time of calling his creditors together; he had frequently consulted witness respecting his affairs; did not know, nor believe he had several bills overdue; was not consulted respecting an advertisement in the Courier; knows he tried to raise a sum of money from the Derwent Bank; it was in order to pay bills as they came due, and save law expences; his debt was then due; he had no security; had security for part of it, by a bill; he gave the bill up at the meeting, and took bills forit to the amount of about £100, at 6, 9, 12, and 15 months; there was a meeting of creditors on the 10th April, when time was given to plaintiff for 6, 9, 12, and 15 months. Plaintiff’s debts at that meeting was about £800; it did appear then that plaintiff was unable to meet his payments as they came due; on a prior occasion, his brother had craved time from his creditors; does not know whattime was given; there was no person present but witness; when he, Mr. Kemp, made use of the word; most positively asserts that the expressions were used by Mr. Kemp before the meeting, and not in thepresence of Mr. Clare; it did not appear that the meeting was called in consequence of any losses recently sustained; does not know that at the time of the negotiation with the Derwent Bank, that theyheld an overdue acceptance.

       

      By Mr. Solicitor General. - Plaintiff could not have paid his debts as they came due without assistance, and that was the reason the meeting was called;Mr. Clare was not present at the meeting.

       

      C. Swanston, Esq., examined. - Recollects a negotiation being carried on between Mr. Wise and the Derwent Bank, about the latter end of May,or beginning of April; it eventually failed; it was for a loan of £300 to the plaintiff; witness thinks he was not satisfied with the securities offered.

       

      Mr. Gellibrand then addressed the Jury at considerable length, and would leave his case in their hands.

       

      His Honor summed up the evidence, and directed the Jury, that if they were satisfied that the expressions complained of, were used by the defendant to the plaintiff, with respect to his business, that they may according to law find a verdict for the plaintiff; but it was not actionable to call a man a swindler who is not in business, or unless it is respecting his business.

       

      The Jury then retired, and after some time returned a verdict for the plaintiff. One farthing damages, on each of the four counts, on the second special plea of justification - found for the defendant on the first and third special pleas of justification.

       

      His Honor was requested to certifyas to the costs; he would consider on the subject.

       

      Pedder C.J., 17 November 1835

       

      Source: Hobart Town Courier, 20 November 1835[2]

       

      The Attorney General moved to make Rule absolute for a new trial, on the grounds that the Verdict was inconsistent and contradictory.

       

      Mr. Gellibrand argued against the Rule.

       

      Rule made absolute, Costs to abide the event of the second trial.

       

      Pedder C.J., 11 December 1835

       

      Source: Hobart Town Courier, 18 December 1835

       

      This was anew trial of the cause which was tried at the sittings after the last term. In was an action for slander; and on the last trial the jury gave a verdict for the plaintiff - damages, one farthing.

       

      The jury retired at 3 o'clock, and after remaining out 12 hours, being unable to agree, were discharged. The cause will be tried again at the sittings after the next term.

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      In 1816, Anthony Fenn Kemp, a thoroughly unpleasant and despotic soldier-merchant, who seems to have spent most of hislife fighting with governors and trying to manipulate the political scene in both New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land settled in the district.

       

      Kemp arrived in Australia in 1795 and served two years at Norfolk Island as a commissioned ensign in the New South Wales Corp. In 1799 he established a shop on the corner of King and George Streets in Sydney where he managed, due to hisprivileged position as treasurer of the Committee of Paymastership, to sell goods to his fellow soldiers at huge profits. One contemporary report suggests that he bullied his fellow soldiers into buying from his shop and marked up his goods by 100 per cent. Attempting to maintain this lucrative sideline he ended up brawling with Governor King over a shipload of brandy, waged a pamphlet war against Governor King, and was instrumental in the overthrow of Governor Bligh.

       

      In 1804 he was appointed second-in-command at Port Dalrymple (Launceston) and from August 1806 to April 1807was in charge of the infant colony.

       

      He settled in Van Diemen's Land in 1816 and by the 1830s, through a combination of grants and purchases, had 4100 acres in the Green Ponds area.It was here that he established and developed Tasmania's infant wool industry, bred horses and cattle, and introduced a hardy, North American, variety of corn.

       

      In some quarters he isknown as the 'Father of Tasmania' but this has much to do with the fact that his family (who married extensively into the upper echelons of Tasmanian society) consisted of seven sons and eleven daughters.

       

      It is not surprising, given the size of Kemp's holdings, that Green Ponds was renamed Kempton in 1840.

      Kemp was an opportunist. He cornered the notorious rum trade in thecolony. Then Kemp took advantage of the presence of the French Explorer Nicolas Baudin to invent an intended French colonisation of Van Diemenís Land and thereby gain a commission for himself and his associates to colonise the island themselves. Despite the history of Tasmania as a penal colony, Kemp seems to have been the biggest crook there. He used his contacts and called in favours to get his own way and to do his enemies down.... and he never paid back his debts. Kemp took an ambivalent attitude to the Aborigines. As a radical and a republican he sympathised with their plight, and thensupported the proposed Black Line, a cordon of settlers who would cross the island, driving the natives before them like like grouse before the beaters.

      -----------------------------------------------------

       

      Rum Rebellion rebel, Church elder, republican, monopolist, chronic stirrer, father of 18 children, acquaintance of George Washington, who amazingly lived to the age of 95.
    Person ID I21000  ONS | KLN Kemp-Welch
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2022 

    Father Ancestors Anthony Facer Kemp,   b. 1728, England, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1792  (Age 64 years) 
    Mother Susannah Fenn,   b. 1747, St Botolph Without Aldgate, London, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Aug 1792, England, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years) 
    Married 1766  England, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 7
    Family ID F5852  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Judith Simpson,   b. 1774, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1836, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 1799  Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 7
    Children 
     1. Emily Eliza Kemp,   b. 4 Jun 1800, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1849, Paddington, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
     2. Anthony Fenn Kemp,   b. 31 Oct 1801, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Dec 1824, Cumberland Street, The Rocks, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 23 years)
    Last Modified 6 Jul 2020 
    Family ID F7336  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Ancestors Elizabeth Riley,   b. 1781, London, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1865, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 25 Jul 1802  St Phillip's, Church of England, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12
    • Ref Number: V1802302 4 Parish: Sydney, St Phillip's, Church of England
      Ref Number: V1802523 3A Parish: Sydney, St Phillip's, Church of England
    Children 
     1. William Kemp,   b. 1803, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +2. George Anthony Kemp,   b. 13 Sep 1806, Yorktown, New South Wales, Australian Colonies Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1888, Loyburn, South Glenorchy, Tasmania, Australian Colonies Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    +3. Elizabeth Julia Kemp,   b. 14 Sep 1808, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1861, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
     4. Francis S Kemp,   b. 14 Sep 1809, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: 1x5. Sophia Kemp,   b. 1810, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1860, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
     6. Edward Kemp,   b. Abt 1811, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Maria Kemp,   b. 1812, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. John Kemp,   b. Abt 1813, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Charles Kemp,   b. 1813, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +10. Fanny Edith Kemp,   b. 27 Sep 1817, Tasmania, Australian Colonies Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     11. Alexander Kemp,   b. 17 Aug 1819, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1895, Green Ponds, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
    Married: 1x12. Amy Fenn Kemp,   b. 1820, Of, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 May 1901, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    Married: 1x13. Ann Georgiana Fenn Kemp,   b. 30 Mar 1821, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1847  (Age 25 years)
    Married: 1x14. Edward Kemp,   b. 1822, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: 1x15. Margaret Louisa Kemp,   b. 1824,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +16. Arthur Kemp,   b. Abt 1824, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Nov 1907, Kangaroo Flat, Victoria, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years)
     17. Lydia Kemp,   b. 1826, Tasmania, Australian Colonies Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: 1x18. Emily Kemp,   b. 26 Jul 1826, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     19. Catherine Georgina Kemp,   b. 1828, Tasmania, Australian Colonies Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: 1x20. Jessy Kemp,   b. 20 Jul 1828, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1863, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)
    +21. Rosa Matilda Kemp,   b. 5 Aug 1830, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1916, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
    Last Modified 14 May 2022 
    Family ID F5851  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1773 - Aldgate, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 16 Jan 1774 - St Botolph Without Aldgate, London, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1799 - Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 25 Jul 1802 - St Phillip's, Church of England, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Oct 1868 - Sandy Bay, Tasmania, Australia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Reference  Andrew D. Kemp. "Anthony Fenn Kemp". KEMP(E) Surname one-name study worldwide - Family History (tree) and Genealogy. https://www.kempfamilyhistory.com/getperson.php?personID=I21000&tree=adkemp (accessed May 22, 2022).

  • Sources 
    1. [S85] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998).

    2. [S162] various, GEDCOM file imported..

    3. [S799] GEDCOM file 2699323.ged submitted by John Edwards, [email protected] (http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2699323). Created on 29 MAR 2005. Imported on 21 Sep 2006..

    4. [S1142] Australian Vital Records 1788 - 1905, Reg. No. 1808/V18081860 1A.

    5. [S1080] Web: Rootsweb Message Board - KEMP, discussion list (http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/surnames.kemp/mb.ashx)., patriciakk; Re: Thomas Kemp Mt Gambier South Australia; 8 April 2004; 6 November 2012.

    6. [S3156] John Edwards, "," e-mail message from [e-mail for private use] ([street address for private use]), to , ., Re: New TNG user registration request; 13 April 2014; Andrew Kemp.

    7. [S4937] Katherine Kemp, GEDCOM: Katherine Kemp.

    8. [S2556] Simon John Brice Williams, "," e-mail message from [e-mail for private use] ([street address for private use]), to , ., Re: New TNG user registration request; 10 August 2012; Andrew Kemp.

    9. [S125] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R) (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of May 24, 2003).

    10. [S90] Internet Contact - email regarding family genealogy and possible link, Fuller ([email protected]).

    11. [S1142] Australian Vital Records 1788 - 1905, Reg. No. 1868/7581.

    12. [S1142] Australian Vital Records 1788 - 1905, Reg. No. 1802/V1802302 4.

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